Bolt Removal Device Instructions

The Hurley Senior and Junior bolt removal devices (collectively referred to as “BRD” or “BRDs”) are prototype bolt extraction devices that are designed to increase the likelihood that a climber replacing old bolts can use the same hole for the new replacement bolt. The Access Fund is working with the BRD developer and other climbers to obtain feedback, testing, and suggestions to improve the BRDs, and is seeking climbers to test the BRDs, to provide feedback (both positive and negative) to the Access Fund on their experiences with the devices, as well as to provide suggestions and recommendations to make the BRDs better.You have agreed to test the BRDs and report your experiences using the BRDs back to the Access Fund

WARNING!!

It is the user’s responsibility to read and fully understand these instructions and illustrations before using the Hurley Junior or Hurley Senior Prototype Bolt Removal Device (the "Jr. BRD" and “Sr. BRD”).

The Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD are designed for rock climbing use only and to facilitate the removal of bolts to make it more likely that the bolt can be replaced by a new bolt in the same hole. Climbing is an inherently dangerous activity that can result in serious injury or death. The Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD are intended for use only by competent and responsible climbers who know how to climb and belay properly and who are competent and experienced in the removal and replacement of bolts. THESE INSTRUCTIONS DO NOT AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO TEACH YOU HOW TO CLIMB, BELAY, DESCEND, OR HOW TO REMOVE AND/OR REPLACE BOLTS. Competence and a thorough knowledge of climbing, belaying, descending, bolt removal and replacement techniques are required before using the Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD.

Proper training is essential before using the Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD. BE SURE TO READ AND FULLY UNDERSTAND THESE INSTRUCTIONS AND DRAWINGS, PRACTICE AND MASTER THE PROPER TECHNIQUES FOR USING THE Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD IN A SAFE ENVIRONMENT AND FULLY UNDERSTAND THE LIMITATIONS AND CAPABILITIES OF THE Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD BEFORE USING THE Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD TO REMOVE BOLTS.

YOU ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR USING THE Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD CORRECTLY.

FAILURE TO USE THE Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD PROPERLY MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. BY REQUESTING AND/OR USING THE Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD, YOU, THE USER, PERSONALLY ASSUME ALL RESPONSIBILITY AND RISK OF SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH TO YOURSELF AND/OR OTHERS ARISING OUT OF YOUR USE OF THE Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD.

Minors, and any other persons who are not legally able to assume this responsibility and/or assume the risks of using the Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD and engage in climbing activities, must only use the Jr. BRD or Sr. BRD under the supervision of a competent and experienced adult.

Please check the Access Fund website frequently for videos, updates, and new safety and other information about the Jr. BRD and Sr. BRD.

Hurley Junior Instructions

Use the Hurley Junior for removing 3/8" wedge bolts and 3/8” split shaft (compression) bolts.

Instructions for removing 3/8" wedge bolts (like #1, #5 & #6 below):



Tools you’ll need:

  • 9/16” wrench
  • ¾” Wrench: any wrench will do. A Gear Wrench is a helpful ratcheting wrench.
  • Hurley Jr Tool: this is a tool designed specifically for pulling bolts by attaching directly to a threaded stud.
  • Spinner Tool: this tool allows a 3/8” wedge bolt to be spun in place using an SDS-plus drill, and is available from the Access Fund or the ASCA.
  • Hammer Drill
  • Hammer
  • Water

Step 1: Unscrew the bolt’s nut with a crescent wrench and remove the hanger.

Step 2: Attach your spinner tool to your hammer drill. Screw it onto the stud of the wedge bolt.

Step 3: With a wrench manually spin the bolt in the hole until it rotates easily. This is important to avoid damaging the SDS end of the spinner tool. Next, with your drill in hammer mode, briefly spin the bolt, pushing it deeper into the hole to disengage the collar. This should only take a burst or two from the trigger. Once the you have accomplished this proceed to Step 4.

Note: While you could tap the stud back into the hole with a hammer to disengage the collar, you risk hammering the bolt in too deeply and, thus, not having enough exposed threads to attach the spinner tool.

Step 4: Change your drill from hammer mode to rotary mode. Pull the trigger and spin the bolt in short bursts. Without applying a lot of force, push and pull the bolt a bit while spinning it. The goal is to grind rock dust into the collar and wear it down a bit. Keep in mind this generates an incredible amount of heat. Because of that, you’ll need to add water. You can use a spray bottle or just spit some water into the hole. If steam comes out or you hear the water sizzling, it’s too hot. Add water and wait another 20 seconds or you’ll risk heating the bolt up too much and breaking it off inside the hole.

Essentially what’s happening in this step is you’re spinning the bolt while the collar stays put. The goal is to score a small groove the collar catches on so that it can no longer fully engage and wedge inside the bolt hole. Be careful not to spin for too long or, again, you can break the bolt.

You may be able to completely spin the bolt out of the hole and not use the Hurley Jr. (see Step 6) at all (quite common in sandstone and limestone). This is a slow-and-steady finesse technique, not a brute-force operation. If you have a Hurley Jr. and it doesn’t look like the bolt will just spin out, stop when the bolt becomes quite loose in the hole. If the bolt locks up on you and won’t spin, put the drill back in hammer mode and push the bolt deeper into the hole to disengage the collar again.

Step 5: Put the drill in reverse, pull the trigger, and unscrew the spinner tool from the bolt.

Step 6: Attach the Hurley Jr. Tool to the stud of the wedge bolt. Line up the Coupling Nut with the stud, then carefully hand-tighten the Tap Bolt head to screw the coupling nut on to the bolt stud. Ensure that the coupling nut is threaded fully on to the stud -- you should continue hand-tighten until you run out of thread or the Coupling Nut makes contact with the rock. At least 3/8” of threading is needed to minimize fatigue on the Coupling Nut.

Step 7: Withdraw the wedge bolt by tightening the Draw Nut. Initially, hand-tighten the Draw Nut until the device is firmly anchored against the rock. Then use a ¾” wrench to tighten the Draw Nut. As stated above, the trick is not to force it. The draw nut should turn easily. If you meet resistance, remove the Hurley Jr Tool and spin the bolt a bit longer. The Hurley Jr provides 5 inches of throw to pull out longer bolts.

Note: If the Coupling Nut comes into contact with the rock face before the bolt makes contact with the internal set screw of the Coupling Nut, it may be useful to screw Coupling Nut further down on the bolt once some progress has been made in extracting the bolt. This will ensure that as many threads as possible are engaged in securing the Coupling Nut to the bolt and may increase the working life of the Coupling Nut.

Step 8: After the bolt has been removed, loosen the bolt fully to gain access to the pulled bolt and reset the device for the next pull.

Note: To increase the working life of the Coupling Nut, chase the threads on the working end of the nut with a 3/8" 16 tap to remove burrs and deformities.



Video courtesy of Greg German

Video courtesy of Greg German

Hurley Senior Instructions

Use the Hurley Senior for removing compression bolts. This technique is best for ¼” and 5/16” button heads.


Instructions for removing Button Head Bolts

Tools you'll need:

  • ¾” Wrench: any wrench will do. A Gear Wrench is a helpful ratcheting wrench.
  • Hurley Sr Tool: this is a tool designed specifically for pulling Button Head (Compression) Bolts. The end piece attaches directly to the hanger.

Step 1: Attach the Hurley Sr Yoke directly to the hanger. To do this, remove the Pin, slide the two ends of the Yoke over the hanger, and then slide the Pin back into place.

Step 2: Position the Hurley Sr over the bolt so that the Tap Bolt is coming out of the top of the puller as straight as possible. You’ll want to pull as straight out as possible to get a nice, clean pull. Tip: always ensure the bottom bearing is seated fully into the lid of the puller when you tighten the device.

Step 3: Tighten the Draw Nut until the hanger bends straight out from the rock. You can look through the holes in the body of the puller to observe the hanger.

Step 4: Loosen the Draw Nut a bit and reposition the Hurley Sr so that the Tap Bolt is coming out of the top as straight as possible. (The “center point” changes when the hanger bends.) Remember, you’ll want to pull as straight out as possible to get a nice, clean pull.

Step 5: Tighten the Draw Nut until the bolt pops out.

Step 6: Loosen the Draw Nut all the remove the hanger from the device and prepare for the next pull.

Tips:

Only use this technique for pulling out Button Head (Compression) Bolts. This works easily for ¼” and 5/16” Button Heads.

If you are pulling on thin (Cro-Moly) SMC hangers, the hanger may be too brittle to pull the bolt. If the hanger breaks, use the Tuning Fork method to pull the bolt the rest of the way out.

Always pull out as straight as possible. In addition to achieving a clean pull, the threads on the Tap Bolt will last longer.

To maximize the lifetime of the Tap Bolt, clean it periodically. Remove it from the device (make sure to note how it the puller is assembled), then apply a degreaser until all the grease is removed. Dry it thoroughly, and re-grease the Tap Bolt with white lithium grease. Clean the bearings in the same manner and reassemble the puller. Depending on the amount of use and care the device receives, the Tap Bolt and Draw Nut will require periodic replacement. Parts can be obtained from the Access Fund.

Pulling bolts should be easy. If you are struggling to tighten the Draw Nut at any time you might damage the device or the rock. Loosen the Draw Nut and ensure that everything is set up properly and that you are pulling on a Compression Bolt.